Ontario’s 42nd Parliament, 1st Session: September 2018

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The House met for 10 days in September. My previous coverage only takes us up to day 4, so let’s start over.

The biggest topic early in the month was the Better Local Government Act and its successor, “Bill 31, Efficient Local Government Act, 2018” which was materially the same but included the Notwithstanding Clause so it could be passed despite being ruled unconstitutional by the courts.

But then the appeal was upheld, and the original act was ruled constitutional. Bill 31 remains on the books, but is unlikely to see further debate. Toronto will have 25 wards this coming election. And Ontario’s government has shown its willingness to invoke constitutional privilege over such a matter.

But what else did the Legislative Assembly do this month besides start a constitutional challenge?

Bill 4, Cap and Trade Cancellation Act, 2018, saw two days of debate in September. It’s the same thing going in circles: The Opposition says it is better than nothing and The Government says it is worse than nothing. I’m with the Opposition on this: make polluting industries pay and use the collected money to improve lives for people.

Bill 6, Poet Laureate of Ontario Act (In Memory of Gord Downie), 2018, was referred to committee. I like the idea of having a Poet Laureate of Ontario to champion the arts in the province.

Bill 7, Fairness in Petroleum Products Pricing Act, 2018, was referred to committee. This is pretty much as expected as it’s adapting what other provinces do to regulate consumer gasoline prices and there’s broad political support for it. I fret a little about anything touching the carbon economy, but I haven’t read anything against it.

Bill 28, Alternative Land Use and Services Program for Agricultural Land Act, 2018, which allows farmers to use parts of their fields as snowbreaks, windbreaks, or other natural features passed second reading and is referred to committee for implementation. It appears to be the first step towards funding farmers for doing so in specific ways. Broad support across the aisles, except on the details of where this might lead. I struggle to understand what this is even about given it doesn’t have funding and it doesn’t actually seem to do anything.

Bill 32, Access to Natural Gas Act, 2018, was introduced. Gas distributors need to invest in infrastructure to deliver natural gas to consumers. Some consumers are cheaper to deliver to than others. This act allows the Energy Board to protect the more expensive-to-deliver-to consumers from paying too much for distribution by allowing the gas distributor to raise rates across its customer base instead of requiring the expensive-to-deliver-to consumers to bear the full weight of the cost of delivery themselves. I’m okay with this so long as it doesn’t give gas distributors the leeway to raise rates in excess of what is necessary to deliver natural gas to consumers.

Bill 33, Rea and Walter Act (Truss and Lightweight Construction Identification), 2018, was introduced. Volunteer firefighters have died when roofs have collapsed on them earlier than expected. This is because lightweight trusses can burn through faster than wood. The bill requires buildings with such faster-to-burn construction to be identified with decals so that firefighters know what they’re facing. This is following the example of other municipalities and state jurisdictions in North America so I guess it’s a good thing? I have no strong opinion on the matter.

Bill 34, Green Energy Repeal Act, 2018, was introduced. It repeals the entirety of the Green Energy Act, 2009 in paper, but keeps several provisions in spirit by moving them to other Acts. The repeal seems mostly concerned with taking all the parts of the Green Energy Act and putting them in different Acts. I’ll need to read the debates to figure out whether there’s anything being left out. If not, I have no problems with the reorganization.

Bill 35, Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2018, was introduced. It adds “immigration status, genetic characteristics, police records and social conditions” to the list of protected classes. I am 100% behind this and I hope that the fact that it was introduced by a Liberal MPP (Nathalie Des Rosiers of Ottawa-Vanier) doesn’t torpedo it.

Bill 36, Cannabis Statute Law Amendment Act, 2018, was introduced. It sets out a licensing scheme for private cannabis retail stores, administered by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission, while simultaneously forbidding the Ontario Cannabis Retail Corporation from opening retail stores. Online it will be the OCRC that holds the monopoly. The OCRC will also be the only supplier to the licensed private retailers. It also makes it so the Government appoints the board of the OCRC, not the LCBO board, and separates the LCBO and the OCRC more firmly. I worry this will diminish provincial income from cannabis sales. I also worry this could result is less adherence to regulations of sale, but given that these are basically the regulations under which tobacco is sold these days I’m not too torn up about that part.

Other miscellaneous governmental business:

  • The province put 220 new GO trains on the Lakeshore corridor. It doesn’t help me (on the Kitchener line) but I’m glad to see improved transit.
  • The government scrapped the Anti-Racism Directorate, the Ministry of International Trade, and the Poverty Reduction Strategy Office.
  • The Premier posed for a picture with a far-right Toronto mayoral candidate with ties to neo-Nazi groups. The Premier, after being pressed, denounced “anyone who wants to talk hate speech.”
  • The Minister of Finance released a report that Ontario has $338B of debt, and reclassified $15B of line items in previous budgets that had been improperly classified as assets.

All in all it seems to be more of the same. No one’s answering the others’ questions (except when the Government asks questions of itself). The House continues to fly into disorder whenever the Premier is asked a question.

It continues to be discouraging to keep up with the assembly month-after-month. But I plan on continuing, because I think it’s important.

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