Distributed Teams: Regional Holidays

Today is German Unity Day, Germany’s National Day. Half of my team live in Berlin, so I vaguely knew they wouldn’t be around… but I’d likely have forgotten if not for a lovely tradition of “Holiday Inbound” emails at Mozilla.

Mozilla is a broadly-distributed organization with employees in dozens of countries worldwide. Each of these countries have multiple days off to rest or celebrate. It’s tough to know across so many nations and religions and cultures exactly who will be unable to respond to emails on exactly which days.

So on the cusp of a holiday it is tradition in Mozilla to send a Holiday Inbound email to all Mozilla employees noting that the country you’re trying to reach can’t come to the phone right now, so please leave a message at the tone.

More than just being a bland notification some Mozillians take the opportunity to explain the history and current significance of the event being celebrated. I’ve taken a crack at explaining the peculiarly-Canadian holiday of Christmas (pronounced [kris-muhs]) in the past.

Sometimes you even get some wonderful piece of alternate history like :mhoye’s delightful, 50% factual exploration of the origins of Canadian Labour Day 2016.

I delight in getting these notifications from our remotees and offices worldwide. It really brings us closer together through understanding, while simultaneously highlighting just how different we all are.

Maybe I should pen a Holiday Inbound email about Holiday Inbound emails. It would detail the long and fraught history of the tradition in a narrative full of villains and heroes and misspellings and misunderstandings…

Or maybe I should just try to get some work done while my German colleagues are out.

:chutten

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Distributed Teams: On the non-Universality of “Not it!”

I’ve surprisingly not written a lot over here about working on a distributed team in a distributed organization. Mozilla is about 60% people who work in MoLos (office workers) and 40% people who don’t (remotees). My team is 50/50: I’m remote near Toronto, one works from his home in Italy, and the other two sit in the Berlin office most days.

If I expand to encompass one extra level of organization, I work with people in Toronto, San Francisco, Poland, Iowa, Illinois, more Berlin, Nova Scotia… well, you get the idea. For the past two and a half years I’ve been working with people from all over the world and I have been learning how that’s different from the rather-more-monocultural experience I had working in offices for the previous 8-10.

So today when I shouted “Not it!” into the IRC channel in response to the dawning realization that someone would have to investigate and take ownership of some test bustage, I followed it up within the minute with a cultural note:

09:35 <chutten> (Actually, that's a cultural thing that may need
 explanation. As kids, usually at summer sleep-away camp, if there
 is an undesirable thing that needs to be done by one person in
 the cabin the last person to say "Not it" is "It" and thus, has
 to do the undesirable thing.)

“Not it” is cultural. I think. I’ve been able to find surprisingly little about its origins in the usual places. It seems to share some heritage with the game of Tag. It seems to be an evolution of the game “Nose Goes,” but it’s hard to tell exactly where any of it started. Wikipedia can’t find an origin earlier than the 1979 Canadian film “Meatballs” where the nose game was already assumed to be a part of camp life.

Regardless of origin, I can’t assume it’s shared amongst my team. Thus my little note. Lucky for me, they seem to enjoy learning things like this. Even luckier, they enjoy sharing back. For instance, :gfritzsche once said his thumbs were pressed that we’d get something done by week’s end… what?

There were at least two things I didn’t understand about that: the first was what he meant, the second was how one pressed one’s thumbs. I mean, do you put them in your fist and squeeze, or do you press them on the outside of your fist and pretend you’re having a Thumb War (yet another cultural artefact)?

First, it means hoping for good luck. Second, it’s with thumbs inside your fist, not outside. I’m very lucky there’s a similar behaviour and expression that I’m already familiar with (“fingers crossed”). This will not always be the case, and it won’t ever be an even exchange…

All four of my team members speak the language I spoke at home while I was growing up. A lot of my culture is exported by the US via Hollywood, embedding it into the brains of the people with whom I work. I have a huge head-start on understanding and being understood, and I need to remain mindful of it.

Hopefully I’ll be able to catch some of my more egregious references before I need to explain camp songs, cringe-worthy 90s slang, or just how many hours I spent in a minivan with my siblings looking for the letter X on a license plate.

Or, then again, maybe those explanations are just part of being a distributed team?

:chutten