Four-Year Moziversary

Wowee what a year that was. And I’m pretty sure the year to come will be even more so.

We gained two new team members, Travis and Beatriz. And with Georg taking a short break, we’ve all had more to do that usual. Glean‘s really been working out well, though I’ve only had the pleasure of working on it a little bit.

Instead I’ve been adding fun new features to Firefox Desktop like Origin Telemetry. I also gave a talk at a conference about Data and Responsibility. Last December’s All Hands returned us to Orlando, and June brought me to Whistler for the first time. We held a Virtual Work Week (or “vorkweek”) a couple of weeks ago when we couldn’t find a time and the budget to meet in person, and spent it planning out how we’ll bring Glean to Firefox Desktop with Project FOG. First with a Prototype (FOGotype) by end of year. And then 2020 will be the year of Glean on the Desktop.

Blogging-wise I’ve slowed down quite a lot. 12 posts so far this calendar year is much lower than previous years’ 25+. The velocity I’d kept up by keeping tabs on the Ontario Provincial Legislature and pontificating about video games I’d played died in the face of mounting work pressures. Instead of spending my off time writing non-mozilla things I spent a lot of it reading instead (as my goodreads account can attest).

But now that I’ve written this one, maybe I’ll write more here.

Resolution for the coming year? More blogging. Continued improvement. Put Glean on Firefox. That is all.

This Week in Glean: Glean on Desktop (Project FOG)

(“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean.)

The Glean SDK is doing well on mobile. It’s shipping in Firefox Preview and Firefox for Fire TV on Android, and our iOS port for Lockwise is shaping up wonderfully well. Data is flowing in, letting us know how the products are being used.

It’s time to set our sights on Desktop.

It’s going to be tricky, but to realize one of the core benefits of the Glean SDK (the one about not having to maintain more than one data collection client library across Mozilla’s products) we have to do this. Also, we’re seeing more than a little interest from our coworkers to get going with it already : )

One of the reasons it’s going to be tricky is that Desktop isn’t like Mobile. As an example, the Glean SDK “baseline” ping is sent whenever the product is sent to the background. This is predicated on the idea that the user isn’t using the application when it’s in the background. But on Desktop, there’s no similar application lifecycle paradigm we can use in that way. We could try sending a ping whenever focus leaves the browser (onblur), but that can happen very often and doesn’t have the same connotation of “user isn’t using it”. And what if the focus leaves one browser window to attach to another browser window? We need to have conversations with Data Science and Firefox Peers to figure out what lifecycle events most closely respect our desire to measure engagement.

And that’s just one reason. One reason that needs investigation, exploration, discussion, design, proposal, approval, implementation, validation, and documentation.

And this reason’s one that we actually know something about. Who knows what swarm of unknown quirks and possible failures lies in wait?

That’s why step one in this adventure is a prototype. We’ll integrate the Glean SDK into Firefox Desktop and turn some things on. We’ll try some things out. We’ll make mistakes, and write it all down.

And then we’ll tear it out and, using what we’ve learned, do it over again. For real.

This prototype won’t have an answer for the behaviour of the “baseline” ping… so it won’t have a “baseline” ping. It won’t know the most efficient way to build a JavaScript metrics API (webidl? JSM? JSContext?), so it won’t have one. It won’t know how best to collect data from the many different processes of many different types that Firefox now boasts, so it will live in just one.

This investigative work will be done by the end of the year with the ultimate purpose of answering all the questions we need in order to proceed next year with the full implementation.

That’s right. You heard it here first:

2020 will be the year of Glean on the Desktop.

:chutten

Distributed Teams: Regional Peculiarities Like Oktoberfest and Bagged Milk

It’s Oktoberfest! You know, that German holiday about beer and lederhosen?

No. As many Germans will tell you it’s not a German thing as much as it is a Bavarian thing. It’s like saying kilts are a British thing (it’s a Scottish thing). Or that milk in bags is a Canadian thing (in Canada it’s an Eastern Canada thing).

In researching what the heck I was talking about when I was making this comparison at a recent team meeting, Alessio found a lovely study on the efficiency of milk bags as milk packaging in Ontario published by The Environment and Plastics Industry Council in 1997.

I highly recommend you skim it for its graphs and the study conclusions. The best parts for me are how it highlights that the consumption of milk (by volume) increased 22% from 1968 to 1995 while at the same time the amount (by mass) of solid waste produced by milk packaging decreased by almost 20%.

I also liked Table 8 which showed the recycling rates of the various packaging types that we’d need to reach in order to match the small amount (by mass) of solid waste generation of the (100% unrecycled) milk bags. (Interestingly, in my region you can recycle milk bags if you first rinse and dry them).

I guess what I’m trying to say about this is three-fold:

  1. Don’t assume regional characteristics are national in your distributed team. Berliners might not look forward to Oktoberfest the way M√ľnchner do, and it’s possible no one in the Vancouver office owns a milk jug or bag cutter.
  2. Milk Bags are kinda neat, and now I feel a little proud about living in a part of the world where they’re common. I’d be a little more confident about this if the data wasn’t presented by the plastics industry, but I’ll take what I can get (and I’ll start recycling my milk bags).
  3. Geez, my team can find data for _any topic_. What differences we have by being distributed around the world are eclipsed by how we’re universally a bunch of nerds.

:chutten