So I’ve Finished The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

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Wow, what a game. It’s a game that had me talking with friends about video games again. You know, in that cagey way where you hint at something you aren’t sure they’ve seen yet until they nod and then you head into spoiler territory?

It’s a game that gives you every tool you need in the tutorial. Swords, shields, bows, bombs… and then you’re off. It doesn’t care what you do from then on, or how you do it. You simply go.

It’s a game that decides to not measure progress. Sure, it’ll count shrines and things… but it doesn’t care. Nothing changes, nothing matters except defeating Ganon. And yet, it is happy to let you take the long way around to get there, both in mechanics and in story. Who needs experience points, or levels, or priority missions, anyway?

It’s not perfect. The framerate drops in the Great Hyrule Forest. It leans a little hard on motion controls that ask you to point with the bottom of the controller instead of the point. Inside the Divine Beasts voices lead you around by the nose as though they didn’t get the “trust the player” memo the rest of the game hinges upon.

And the entire Gerudo segment comes across as tone deaf. Treating an ancient culture’s mores as a puzzle to “solve” because you know “better” is a little colonial for the 21st Century.

But then you hold these stumbles up to moments like when the Deku tree says “Next time I’ll let you kill yourself on that sword” and you believe it. The game has been honest with you so far, trusting you and being trusted almost to a fault. I believed that tree about that sword.

Speaking of that sword, pulling it was billed as a test of strength. “Strength?” There are no character sheets in Breath of the Wild, what is strength? Strength is the number of hearts you have. You are stronger when you have more heart. WHAT.

I’m especially pleased with this game coming straight off of Mass Effect: Andromeda. The cartoon characters you meet in Hyrule are different and recognizably so from their design. Even the hapless travellers you rescue time and time again are expressive in text and in facial expression.

ME:A also never wanted to let the player fail. Zelda is only too happy to have you fail. Too close to your own bomb when it goes off? Congratulations, you ragdolled down a cliff and into the river. Find a guardian? They’ll roflstomp you for hours. And you keep running across them! Even the main quest has you tromping up a hill in Zora’s Domain and finding something you cannot win against. Not because the game has decided it, but because you’re just not ready. And you can brickwall against it, like I did. Maybe if you jump over here, maybe if you use lightning arrows… Nope. You aren’t supposed to win this fight. You are the mouse, not the lion (or in this case, the Lynel). Scurry, little mouse, and try not to be seen.

Oh. No. You’ve been seen. Better run, little mouse. Run!

I’m sure there’s a wave of people who’ve seen this first in games like Dark Souls, but for me Zelda: Breath of the Wild was the first game in recent memory that made me afraid.

And how I love it for doing so.

Attacking Hyrule Castle, pushing deeper within. Everything the world taught you being put to the test, but upside down. On the overworld height helps you find your way, lets you see danger coming. In the Castle, height will get you killed. Better run, little mouse.

Wait. No. You’re not a mouse any more. You’ve fought, you’ve learned, you’ve grown.

But… you still remember being a mouse. So the tension ratchets up more than it ought to, creatures down the hall loom a little larger than they actually are, and victory… oh, victory tastes so much sweeter when you remember how impossible it used to be.

And then you reach Ganon. They really didn’t mind being a little disgusting with the creature design of the calamity bosses, and Ganon got a double dose. I feel a little cheap not having learned the perfect parry before fighting him, having to rely on my powers to defeat him… but that’s fitting. It works with the story. The champions were there for the assist.

Or so I tell myself.

The ending… was fine. The writing was a little weak, but everything else was lovely. I’m a little disappointed I don’t get to play in the world my adventure helped create, instead being dumped outside the castle gates, moments before the final confrontation, but it was an end.

And so I decided to put Zelda: Breath of the Wild down. I feel I could spend a lot more time in there. I feel I may have played it “wrong” by rushing too much to expand the map without exploring it enough (and my final map percentage of 40.03% certainly seems to reflect that). I can think of, right now, another couple of corners of the map I maybe should’ve gotten to.

But some things should end. Some things should leave you with that bittersweet hangover of a world your mind isn’t finished living within.

It’s been a long time since I’ve felt that from a video game. I missed it.

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