So I’ve Finished Mass Effect: Andromeda

As much as I enjoyed Maps-Fulla-Icons-Style Open World when BioWare did it for Dragon Age: Inquisition… I might be done with it. Either that or Mass Effect: Andromeda wasn’t the best venue for it, because at the end of the game I’m left feeling a sense of relief.

There was so much game in that game. So many NPCs with so many quests, so many numbers to watch increment and decrement. So many collectibles and beautiful vistas.

Too much.

You land on a planet and the map’s already full of icons. Tasks you haven’t even been told about light up as little white hexagons with inconveniently-small text with poor readability (or I’m old). No signs of where habitation is, or structures, or points of interest, or regional names. Just icons, as far as the eyes can see. I’m happy to have a direction to stretch in to find what I’m after. But giving me all of the quest locations before I get to them… I’m thinking that was a patch job on a design fault where people couldn’t find content unless there was a marker on it.

Even though there’s too much of everything, there’s too little care spent on entire swathes. For instance, if you feel you have to tell players how to skip planet-to-planet animations, maybe that’s a sign of a problem you shouldn’t have shipped?

I didn’t purchase the game until after the 1.10 update hit, which means I was able to skip the worst of the bugs, but my companions would still clip through terrain (intentionally at gravity wells, unintentionally on planet surfaces) and I still haven’t received my trophy for 100% viability on all known worlds (possibly because I hit that milestone before the final fight). And emotions on faces just… aren’t there, most of the time?

A lot of this screams “new engine disease” to me. This was BioWare’s first tangle with Frostbite 3. When you build everything from scratch, you miss the bugs you’d fixed (with hackity hacks and inelegant architectural bypasses, true) years ago. So there are bugs. Audio that doesn’t fire, or pauses for several seconds before firing. Location-based triggers that yell over a character conversation that was honestly more interesting than “We’ve arrived at that place you know we’ve arrived at because we put a notification in the top-right that says you advanced your quest by one quest unit.”

Not all of it is bugs, though. This was an evolution of the Mass Effect design, not a revolution. Open World-ing it… well, that takes care of where to stage the battles and exploration. And the battles and exploration mechanics were fun. I liked the jump-jets, the way enemies kept me on my toes, and even the car (especially on the asteroid. Whee!).

But they haven’t accounted for what to do when your conversation wheel’s empty. And it’s still a conversation wheel. And the “Chose amongst these two imperfect choices” events are still present, mostly unimproved by the “You have three seconds to chose by hitting R2 or not” quick-time-event mechanic.

On the plus side, it was gorgeous. Every direction I looked was another screenshot. The combat was solid (when enemies didn’t become trapped in the scenery). Anything that was big felt absolutely massive. You drive towards this ship in the desert and keep driving… and driving… how big the planet feels. And when find yourselves up against an Architect and ohgod-ohgod-ohgod-… until you realize it’s just a repetitive bullet sponge.

*sigh* what I wouldn’t give for “difficult” to stop meaning “has an order of magnitude more HP”.

All in all, if what you’re after in a game is more Mass Effect, this will scratch that itch satisfactorily. The set-pieces were well-crafted, the worldbuilding quite alright. I’d be happy to see more done in this world.

But maybe something smaller? Give me the trials and tribulations of a young family just out of cryo trying to make it work. Skip a generation and show me what happens with the new crop of core species having grown up knowing only Andromeda and being quite done with caring about what happened in the Milky Way. You can really lean on how Salarians have so many fewer years than even humans.

There are stories to be told here, and games to play. Tell a different one this time, maybe?

 

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